Confirmed: PMDs & Bicycles to Have a Speed Limit of 10kmh on Footpaths

Image: Ingus Kruklitis / Shutterstock.com

I’m not sure whether I should be rejoicing or crying over this piece of news.

On one hand, I’ll feel safer as I walk on footpaths with my earphones on. On the other hand, I might have to stay hungry longer when I order my nasi lemak from Deliveroo.

Because it’s now confirmed: the speed limit for PMDs and bicycles would be cut to 10kmh on footpaths.

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Lower Speed Limit After Advisory Panel’s Recommendation

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Now, you might not know this, but there’s apparently a speed limit on footpaths for PMDs and bicycles.

Currently, the speed limit is 15kmh. The limit for cycling or shared paths is at 25kmh instead.

PMD users aren’t supposed to be riding on roads (yeah, so all those daredevil-PMD-users-on-roads videos you see online are illegal). First time-offender caught riding on minor roads would be fined $300 while those on major roads would be fined $500.

If a PMD user upped his game and rode on expressway, he would be charged in court instead, facing up to $2,000 fine and/or up to three months imprisonment.

As for bicycles, they can be on the roads, though they can’t be on expressways (for obvious reasons).

Survey Showed Singaporeans Still Feel Unsafe

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A survey prior to this announcement shows that Singaporeans are still not comfortable with the speed limit of 15 kmh. 77% of the 6,000 people surveyed wants it to be lowered. The same percentage wants helmets to be compulsory for cyclists, kind of like motorcyclists.

Just for comparison’s sake (I know this is silly, but at least you’ll get the idea), a person who’s running at a constant speed for 2.4 km within 12 minutes is moving at a speed of 12 kmh.

Pretty fast, I’d say, even for 12kmh.

New Speed Limit: 10 kmh

Image: Dmytro Zinkevych / Shutterstock.com

About two weeks ago, the Active Mobility Advisory Panel submitted six new recommendations on the use of PMDs and bicycles. Today, it’s announced that all six of them are accepted.

Starting from early 2019 (the date is not yet confirmed), the speed limit on footpaths for both PMD users and bicycles would be reduced to 10 kmh.

According to the Ministry of Transport, this would allow PMD users, cyclists and pedestrians to react in unforeseen circumstances (i.e. a collision ‘coz you’re too engrossed in your phone while the rider is chiong-ing to save some starving adults).

The other recommendations are as follow:

  • Cyclists must wear helmets when they’re on the road
  • PMD users and bicyclists have to “stop and look out for oncoming traffic” at road crossing (wait, isn’t this common sense?!)
  • No need for third-party insurance, and the focus should be on prevention of accidents. However, the avenue to seek compensation should be more accessible
  • To educate the public more on using public paths and roads

(Article continues below) Do you know that during the Hungry Ghost Month, you shouldn’t lean on the wall or talk to yourself? Here’s a video on the list of taboos you probably didn’t know about: if you don’t want any unwanted visitors today, you’d better watch it!

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Well, guess you now know why everyone is focused on the speed limit, because the other recommendations don’t really affect us much.

Whatever it is, here’s a takeaway: the authorities are serious about making our paths and roads safer without compromising on Singapore’s car-lite direction.

So yeah, if my food is going to be slightly late, I’ll gladly take that.

#politicallycorrectansweralways

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