Everything About the FB Message Scam You Need to Know in 60 Sec

Image: Marketing Land

According to Channel NewsAsia, there’s a new hoax in town baiting on Facebook Messenger users.

I know what you’re thinking… who still uses Facebook?

You’ll be surprised to know that yours truly does.

And so does my colleagues, friends and family members!

Image: Tenor GIF Keyboard

So really, Facebook isn’t that outdated as you thought. Maybe it’s just not your cup of tea.

Anyways for those of you that still remain loyal to this website, do take note of this new scam:

Image: CNA

Experts like Hoax Slayer, which specializes in debunking email and social media hoaxes, have cautioned about these video messages.

These messages are meant to steal login details of Facebook users or trick victims into installing malware on their devices.

Image: Giphy
Hoax Slayer says that it is most likely that your friend’s account has been hijacked, if you were to receive such a message from him/her.

Here are some different versions of the scam:

Type 1

Those who click on the link will be directed to a website that replicates that of a Facebook login page.

Actual Facebook login page:

Unfortunately, we can’t get hold of the scam login page.

They will be asked for their account details if they want to play the video.

But obviously luh, they’ll just be greeted by disappointments because there’s zero videos waiting to be played.

And that’s when they realise they’ve been fooled.

Image: Tenor GIF Keyboard

Their Facebook account are then hijacked and the same message will be sent to more friends.

Type 2

The fake website will direct victims to copy and paste a code into the address bar of their browser for the video to play.

Again, there’s no videos, just a harmful JavaScript that gives hackers the right to control their account.

Type 3

In this version,victims are directed to a page that seems like a video waiting to be played.

It is a tendency for anyone to click on ‘play’, which will then direct victims to a series of websites that lists out the information of their browser, operating system, and other important information.

The malware will use tracking cookies to analyze the victim’s online activity, and pretend to ‘read into their mind’ and display customised ads according to their preference.

Hackers can even guide victims to click on more links.

Previous versions

It all started via YouTube links shared on Facebook. The posts would often utilize victim’s first names and claim that they have been tagged in a YouTube video.

Another version of the scam would be videos showing Justin Bieber being ‘stabbed’ by a crazy fan.

Image: Naked security

How to avoid being scammed

Facebook has also been stepping up its security measures by providing a wide array of two-factor authentication (2FA) methods.

Facebook users will be prompted to enter a special security code or confirm login attempts every time someone attempts to access Facebook from an unknown device that Facebook does not recognise.

To do so:

  • Click the arrow pointing downwards in the top-right corner after you login to Facebook

  • Click Settings > Security and Login
  • Scroll down to use 2FA> Edit

  • Choose your preferred authentication method

  • Click enable and turn the authentication method on

Since you’re here, why not watch a video about a guy who lodged a Police report here in Singapore because he was friendzoned? Seriously. Here, watch it and do remember to share it (and also subscribe to Goody Feed YouTube channel)!

This article was first published on goodyfeed.com

Read Also

Do you love writing? Do you want a platform to showcase your works? Goody Feed is looking for part-time writers to join the team! Click here to find out more!

Featured image: Marketing Land