Japanese Fans Picked Up Rubbish After World Cup Game, Winning the Match & Netizens

Image: Twitter (@pinkys421)

So, we all know that the Japanese are notorious for being really polite and respectful.

And I mean, come on, remember the time when the Japanese bus drivers went on strike?

Yeah, they didn’t create trouble for anyone except the people they had an issue with. And they did that by just going about their day as per normal – with the only exception of not accepting fares from bus riders.

Man, they are really one group of people we can all learn something from, because the last time bus drivers went on strike in Singapore, it didn’t go well.

Now, the Japan got into the headlines again for just too Japanese

On 19 June 2018, the Japanese brought themselves a good name at the World Cup again.

No, I’m not just talking about their 2-1 win against the Colombian team.

Although you gotta admit, that win was so damn impressive…seems like the giants are falling this year.

I’m talking about what the Japanese fans did after the match was over.

They started picking up rubbish after the game

Armed with their blue bags that got famous the last World Cup when they were partying with it during their point against Germany, Japanese fans promptly displayed their civic-minded and respectful culture at the 2018 World Cup…

…by placing all their trash and the trash around them into those blue bags.

Now, the Japanese thought it was strange that they should get such attention and praise for cleaning up after themselves and the area that they were sitting in.

Making it the icing on the cake.

Because it seems that to them, this is just common sense. If that’s my trash, why should I wait for someone else to clean it up?

It shows that they are one group of people that are certainly not going around as lazy, entitled or spoilt human beings.

Which ahem, we can sometimes be guilty of, let’s be honest.

Real talk now, it’s okay to lose sight of this stuff once in awhile lah.

Here in Singapore, even returning trays is an hassle

Closer to home, initiatives have been implemented to force people to return their trays or they’ll have to pay a small fee. Unsurprisingly, with a deposit of $1, there is only a 97% return rate: the 3% would rather forfeit that $1.

And worse, some even return the trays but left their used crockery behind (might as well don’t return lah).

Doesn’t matter if Japan didn’t lift the World Cup

I’m sure if there was a World Cup for being the most responsible and civic-minded country, they’d win it.

In the meantime, I’m sure as heck super psyched to see how the Japanese team continues to perform at this year’s World Cup. Go Japan!

Now you know what Singaporeans are talking about today; do check back tomorrow for another piece of news of the day!


Rachael Divya

Rachael Divya

Life is one big adventure, so you can find her on the next flight out. (But when flights are too expensive, you can find her in bed catching up on the twenty TV shows she’s decided to watch.) Food time is her favourite time of every day, and way too many things interest her so now she’s just a jumbled-up ball of curiosity navigating this messy, happy little world she has.
Rachael Divya