LTA’s New PMD Regulations Simply Shows That S’poreans Don’t Deserve Nice Things

Singaporeans always say bike-sharing brings out the ugly side of Singaporeans.

Image: straitstimes.com

True.

But you know what I think?

Personal Mobility Devices (PMDs) brings that ugly side out even more.

When the idea of PMD first came about, it was a very good idea.

Theoretically.

Image: straitstimes.com

It helps people get some exercise in their sedentary lifestyles. The devices are in line with the vision of Singapore as a car-lite city.

They help reduce pollution.

Plus, it helps to save money.

All benefits, right?

Nope.

Because when it comes into human hands, that’s when human errors like these come in.

Image: channelnewsasia.com

Like the teenager who knocked down an elderly lady at Ang Mo Kio, then ran away without offering assistance.

She had to suffer a scar on the bridge of her nose, scrapes on her elbow and knees.

And there are even worse cases than just running off.

The guy who accelerated and knocked down a little kid

Image: STOMP

22-year-old Du Aiwen, instead of slowing down, stepped on the accelerator and sped on the footpath when he saw an 8-year-old kid, together with his father and a family friend.

The kid stepped in front of the e-scooter and was knocked to the ground.

Du and his wife also fell to the ground.

Getting up, he walked to the boy and started scolding him. When the father attempted to right the situation, he raised his fist up threateningly.

Du tried to flee when the father called the police but was restrained by the family friend.

And errant riders are not restricted to the pavements; they’re a menace on the roads too

Image: STOMP

You might have seen this on the roads of Singapore.

Daredevil e-scooter riders who think their grandfather owns the road they’re riding on.

 

All these hassles just because these jokers on two wheels can’t take care of themselves.

And the best part? People are still doing it anyway.

So we’re not surprised at what comes next.

New PMD regulations For Personal Mobility Devices

If you haven’t heard, the LTA has put into place new regulations for Personal Mobility Devices (PMDs) with immediate effect on Labour Day.

Image: GreetyHunt

Finally!

Image: straitstimes.com

With the new rules, the devices’ max speed will be capped at 25km/h. Kind of like SAF 5 Tonners which has its speed capped at 50km/h.

Image: straitstimes.com

Plus, the devices must be of a certain size so they won’t be a huge obstruction on footpaths.

Or cause too much damage during a collision.

As well as heavier punishments for errant riders.

Jail time included.

Image: Quickmeme

Personal Mobility Devices Has To Be Registered with LTA Too

To encourage ownership and reduce reckless riding, the LTA accepted the advice of the Active Mobility Advisory Panel.

All PMD owners are required to register their devices with the authorities.

They’ll be given a sticker that has to be pasted in full view on their PMD when they ride it around.

Personal details will have to be provided by the owners during the registration.

So that it’s easier to identify errant riders and punish them harshly.

The new rules demonstrate one thing: Singaporeans don’t deserve nice things

It’s pretty sad, but if you were to take a look at the new rules even more closely, you’d notice one thing.

The things the new regulations enforced like not speeding on footpaths, not beating up on people, not making a nuisance of themselves, stop to help accident victims; they’re all basic courtesy.

Or heck, they’re safety precautions so that people won’t get injured.

It’s just that selected riders are so lacking in the department the authorities have to step in and regulate.

Shows you how much we’ve come in our 50 years of independence, huh?

Image: imgflip.com

Bicycle sharing now needs rules, and PMDs now need rules.

While no one can say that we live in an Utopia world, it seems like without rules, we’ll all go haywire.

No wonder Thanos wants to wipe out half the population.

Do come back tomorrow for more commentaries!


Boon Hun

Boon Hun

Armed with paper and pen, or rather keyboard and the internet, he wants to change the world one word at a time. I guess you could call him a keyboard warrior, except he doesn't troll, honest!
Boon Hun