A Pro Gamer Today can Earn Over $5,000 a Month with Benefits

Image: Gorodenkoff / Shutterstock.com

Alright, my words are gonna sound a lil’ crazy but there’s definitely a grain of truth in it. So here goes;

Gaming can actually get you revenue nowadays.

But wait up; before you start throwing stuff at me, let me just start with a key event that’s going to take place in Singapore very soon:

A FIFA tournament comprising the top 64 players in the industry.

But here’s the thing: they’re not competing for your average $2,000, $5,000 or even $10,000 prize.

They’re battling it out for $50,000.

Yes, folks.

$50,000.

Image: Giphy

Champion takes it all

Meet Donovan “F2Tekkz” Hunt.

Despite being just 17 years of age, Hunt has become the hottest player on the FIFA gaming circuit right now, sitting atop the football simulation game’s global leaderboards for Xbox One.  The accomplishment comes after he swept two of four major tournaments in the 2018-19 season.

Image: BBC

Oh, and he also picked up US$100,000 (S$135,693) in the process.

Dope, huh?

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But it’s evidently not enough as Hunt’s battling it out once again, this time as one of 64 top Fifa players who will be showcasing their skills in Singapore at the US$100,000 PGL Fifa Ultimate Team (FUT) Champions Cup, held from Friday to Sunday (8 March to 10) at [email protected] in Jurong East.

The champion takes home US$50,000.

Profession: Pro Gaming

And that leads to my hypothesis:

Pro gaming can actually be considered a… well… profession. But the question is…

How much can you earn from it?

According to info.jkcp.com, the average eSports salary is actually around $60,000. And that’s not even the highest.

Doubting it? I don’t blame you. But here, take a look at these statistics Esportsearnings.com previously reported.

  • Top player of 2017 has earned a prize of $2,436,772.40
  • The highest overall esports salary is currently $3,626,277.75, earned by Kuro Takhasomi, a Dota 2 player
  • The highest earnings by a country amount to $72,016,179.71 made by 2,783 players in China
  • The highest earnings by age are $31,212,142.96 made by 1,372 22-year-old players.
  • The highest earnings by players under 18 years old are $2,712,139.14 earned by Dota 2 player Sumail Hassan in 2015.
  • The highest paid League of Legends player is currently Lee ‘Faker’ Sang Hyeok with the overall gamer salary of $ 897,818.98.
  • The highest paid esports players according to earned prizes are Dota 2 players.

Granted, they’re record numbers and thus shouldn’t be related to average salaries. But still, that should paint the overall consensus:

Pro gaming does get you dough.

But There’s a Catch

What shouldn’t be falsified, however, is that regular esports salaries differ from team to team and from player to player. In League of Legends, for example, the regular monthly salaries of average pro gamers can range from $1,000 to $5,000, while the highest paid LoL players can reap up to $15,000 per month (apart from the money they get from prizes).

And in December 2015, Ember, a North American League of Legends team, was the first organisation to publicly disclose their players’ salaries. The pro gamer salary for Ember players ranges vastly, from $65,000 to $75,000 with extra bonuses that can reach as high as $27,000. Additionally, Ember registers its players on the payroll as employees rather than say, contractors. Heck, there’s even health insurance! If this is in Singapore, they’ll also get CPF seh!

Say what?

And keep in mind that the figures stem from 2015. At the rate e-Sports is growing, it wouldn’t be a surprise if the salaries and prizes were inflated even more.

So… what’re you waiting for?

Of course, I’m not suggesting that you put down your career in favour of one in the gaming industry. That’ll just be career suicide (unless you’re like a gaming genius or something).

What this article is insinuating, rather, is that instead of discouraging your loved ones from gaming…

Why not see how it goes instead?

Because you never know; he/she might just turn out to be a gaming prodigy, and at the rate, this industry is expanding…

it wouldn’t be a surprise if gaming does turn out to be profitable in the long run.

I mean; whoever expected phones to be this profitable back in the 60s?

Image: mymemes.biz

Same same but different.