YouTube Music and YouTube Premium Now Available In Singapore; Can Download YouTube Videos

Image: engadget

Business warfare has made its way onto the Internet and it’s not slowing down.

YouTube had the monopoly on video sharing, Spotify for music streaming, and Netflix for TV/movie streaming.

But then came Apple Music to challenge Spotify and multiple platforms such as Disney+ to challenge Netflix.

Google, the parent company of YouTube since 2006, isn’t letting up either.

They’ve launched YouTube Music and YouTube Premium as their answers to Spotify and other Internet giants.

On 6 November (My birthday Wednesday), it was launched in Singapore.

If you’re confused and need detailed info and analysis, Goody Feed is here to help.

YouTube Music

Firstly, it’s a separate app from the regular YouTube.

It’s a music streaming service similar to Spotify which has applications for iOS + Android and is also compatible with computers and Google assistant speakers.

This is probably Google’s answer to all the people who love using YouTube only for the music.

But fret not, as music videos and similar content are staying on the regular YouTube as well.

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YouTube Premium

If you’re a fellow cheapo, the word ‘premium’ always scares you.

Well, you’re right this time. It’s a monthly subscription plan for premium usage of YouTube.

The regular YouTube Premium costs $11.98 for Android users and $15.98 for iPhone users.

It allows for an ad-free usage and offline downloads of your favourite videos.

Yes, now you can watch your oppa MVs even without WiFi.

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Image: Giphy

But honestly, if you’re Internet-savvy enough, you don’t need YouTube Premium to gain both of those features. *wink*

YouTube Music Premium

On the contrary of what you’d expect, YouTube Music Premium is cheaper than the regular YouTube Premium, as they’re separate services.

YouTube Music Premium costs $9.98 for Android users and $12.98 for iOS users.

The free version of YouTube Music is similar to the free Spotify. You have to bear with ads, and you can’t download the songs to listen offline.

On top of that, the music will stop running if you minimise the app or lock your screen.

Image: Tenor.com

One pro it does have over the free Spotify is that you retain the ability to freely select and skip songs.

But yeah, not much of a point for heavy usage of the free version. Fun to have, though.

YouTube Music vs Spotify: The Good

However, YouTube Music Premium also offers some very nice features not found in Spotify.

While Spotify usually only has the official studio/radio versions, YouTube Music boasts its collection of live performances, remixes, covers, dance practices, etc.

You can even smoothly switch between song and music video in the app.

It also has a smart download feature, where it will automatically download songs overnight (on WiFi) based on your music preferences and tastes.

I guess Spotify has similar features, but you’d have to download it manually.

If you log in to the app using your Google account, they will analyse your preferences based on music videos watched and put songs into the “Your mixtape” playlist as seen in the screenshot earlier on.

YouTube Music vs Spotify: The Bad

As said earlier, you have to keep your app open constantly to listen to it for the free version, which is a drawback that free Spotify doesn’t have.

It also doesn’t have podcasts, but do people really listen to podcasts on Spotify too?

Also while M1 and Singtel have unlimited data streaming plans for Spotify, there is no such plan for YouTube Music.

But really, you can just download all the songs at home with WiFi like me and you’re good to go.

As ads go, this certain user claims that it has “10x more ads than Spotify“.

But take that with a grain of salt.

Verdict

So I guess it’s pretty good all things considered?

The only defining factor is the music library size, but Google has declined to comment on it.

So if you want your specific M-Countdown 2018 performance of Bboom Bboom or Neil Patrick Harris’ opening number at the 2013 Tony Awards only available on YouTube, go for it.