E-Scooter Rider Who Collided With Car Exiting Gate Sparks Debate About Whose Fault It is

Image: Facebook (Singapore Road Accident)

If you’ve ever ridden an e-scooter before, I think it’s safe to say that going fast is terrifying. While the feeling of wind breezing through is exhilarating, the fear of hitting into someone scares me into slowing down.

And if you’ve ever driven a car before, I think it’s safe to say that you feel safe with the knowledge of driving countless times, but also keep alert when needed to avoid summons and accidents.

So when an e-scooter collides with a car at an inconveniently dangerous place, who should take responsibility? Was the rider abandoning the fear for excitement, or was the driver forgetting the alertness for comfort?

Source: Tenor

Here is the breakdown of the accident to help you make your choice

According to the video posted by Singapore Road Accident, it all started at the exit gate.

The car appeared to be slowly making it’s way out the exit, before slightly speeding up as he neared the gate.

There was a split second of blue as a figure rushed into the view of the camera before that blue figured catapulted into the air and fell. Even from the mirrors set before the gate, the rider could not be seen until it was too late.

Here, take a look at the incident via a gif (and also take note of the soft toy):

Image: Facebook (Singapore Road Accident)

(The soft toy so cute right?)

Anyways.

The rider cradled his head as the security guard appeared to the scene to help him up. He did so in a rather unstable manner but was seemingly fine apart from his head injury.

The couple in the car came down; the driver briefly checking on rider before checking on the car. His wife did the same, before proceeding to help the rider pick up his scooter.

The driver began talking and gesturing somewhat agitatedly while the rider remained bent over. At the end of the video, the driver could be seen speaking with a passer-by, who had stopped to speak up.

Ah Hock loved Michelle and asked her, ‘Ai stead mai?’ in the 90s. Today, he tried again but would it work? Prepare some tissue paper and watch their love story here:

Here, You Can Watch The Video For Yourself:

Guidelines

Before even going into pushing blames, let’s look at a few guidelines set by authorities, shared by a kind soul.

Source: Facebook

Now that we know the rules, let’s get down to business.

It’s the Rider’s Fault

Party one blamed the rider for going at a speed too fast to be considered acceptable at a crossing. Arguments are as follows:

Source: Facebook

No, It’s Reckless Drivers Again

Party two, on the other hand, criticised the driver for being too careless.

Source: Facebook

But despite the fact that there are only two parties involved: the driver and the rider.

There Are Two More Camps

Party three, on yet one more hand, had an absolutely polar view on who should take the blame. It ran a gamut of people (and even things), like the architect of the building, or the “blurry” mirrors in front of the building, or even the gates fault for sliding and not opening.

Party four are the people who stand by their stance that both the rider and driver are flawed.

But in the end, the big question that Singaporeans all love to ask is, “Where can buy the soft toy? Who is going to pay for the damage?”