Important Things to Do When You Have a Minor Accident with a M’sia Vehicle in S’pore

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Some drivers believe that whenever a Singapore vehicle crash with a Malaysia vehicle in Singapore, regardless of who is at fault, it’s impossible to do a claim with their respective insurance companies—either they do a private settlement or they just claim own damage.

Well, to some extent, that’s (unfortunately) true.

Therefore, the very first advice is this: drive safe, keep a safe distance and never be an aggressive driver.

After all, cars are very expensive in Singapore. Here, check out a video in which we break down the costs (yes, cost with a “s”) of car ownership in Singapore:

So, what do you do if you, unfortunately, have an accident with a Malaysia vehicle?

If it’s your fault, then it’s the driver of the Malaysia vehicle who will have headaches, because he’ll, too, find it almost impossible to claim against you.

But what if it’s not your fault? Here’s what you need to do.

Firstly, the chances of claiming third-party insurance from a foreign vehicle is very slim. Even if it’s possible, it’ll take years for the claim to take effect, and by then, you would either have changed your car or claimed your own insurance.

Nevertheless, the very first thing to do is to make a police report, regardless of how serious it is. This is for the authorities to determinate whether there’s any foul play. If indeed there is, the authorities will then block the foreign vehicle from leaving the country so as to conduct further investigations, since it will no longer be a civil case but a criminal one.

Now, after that, prepare all the documents just like how you would deal with an accident with a local vehicle. However, there’s one thing extra: take an image of the Malaysia road tax disc.

Here’s how it looks like.

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Image: blog.carlist.my
Image: blog.carlist.my

Upon that, provide all details to your insurance company, who would decide on whether to pursue the issue for you.

If all things fail, then you can contact Persatuan Insuran Am Malaysian (PIAM) or the General Insurance Association of Singapore (GIA), though there’s no guarantee that you can get any third-party claims.

Our advice? Do what is mentioned above, but don’t pin too much hope—just treat it as bad luck, because the hassle to pursue the matter might not be worth the effort. You’ll most likely have to claim OD (own damage) and say goodbye to your NCD.