MHA Calls for Tender for Trial of Fully Automated Driving Circuit That Will be Used to Test Motorcyclists

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Here’s a true story: when I went for my second driving test, I managed to ace all the circuit courses and drove on the roads with the calmness of a 50-year-old cabbie.

Then, just before my test ended, my tester slammed the glove box with his palm, indicating that I had to perform an emergency break.

But I panicked, and stepped on the accelerator instead. Normally, that would an immediate failure, but the incredibly nice tester let it slide and actually passed me. You may have experienced something similar as well.

Since most humans have what we call emotion and empathy, they might let some minor mistakes slide if they think you’re competent enough to drive and ride on the roads of Singapore.

But soon, motorists won’t have a lenient human tester to turn to for help.

MHA Calls for Tender for Trial of Fully Automated Driving Circuit That Will be Used to Test Motorcyclists

If a riding test trial is successful, learner motorcyclists and drivers could soon be evaluated by an automated system instead of a human tester.

According to The Straits Times, the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) has called a tender for a trial of a fully automated circuit that will use technology to test motorcycle riders.

The Intelligent Driving Circuit (IDC) does not require any human testers, and will eventually replace the current testing method.

The trial will be conducted on selected Class 2, 2A, and 2B motorcycles at the Singapore Safety Driving Centre (SSDC) in Woodlands Industrial Park.

How Will it Work?

While it would be nice to have a human-looking robot furrowing its brows every time you make a mistake, it’s not exactly as advanced as that.

The motorcycles in the trial will be fitted with sensors and cameras which will detect errors made by the rider.

For instance, there’s an emergency stop station where the automated testing system will detect errors related to speed and safety.

These errors include:

  • Failing to attain a minimum speed of 30kmh for Class 2B motorcycles and 40kmh for Class 2 and 2A motorcycles before performing the emergency stop
  • Failing to look straight ahead and holding the handlebar firmly with both hands
  • Failing to grip the fuel tank with both knees

The system will also be able to detect if a rider is applying insufficient braking force and  applying the brakes early, to name a few.

Immediate failures include falling off the motorcycle and causing the motorcycle to lean over by more than 45 degrees.

Test Must Be 100% Accurate Before it Can Replace Human Testers

It’s not certain that this automated system will replace human assessors, though.


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It will only be considered if it is at least 80% accurate in detecting and highlighting errors.

And it will need to achieve

Here’s a true story: when I went for my second driving test, I managed to ace all the circuit courses and drove on the roads with the calmness of a 50-year-old experienced cabbie.

Then, just before my test ended, my tester slammed the glove box with his palm, indicating that I had to perform an emergency break.

But I panicked, and stepped on the accelerator instead. Normally, that would an immediate failure, but the very nice tester let it slide and actually passed me. You may have experienced something similar as well.

Since most humans have what we call emotion and empathy, they might let some minor mistakes slide if they think you’re competent enough to be on the streets of Singapore.

So you go to social media and it appears that everyone is agreeing with your views. Watch this video to the end and you’d realise that there’s a disturbing reason behind this:

But soon, motorists won’t have a lenient human tester to turn to for help.

MHA Calls for Tender for Trial of Fully Automated Driving Circuit That Will be Used to Test Motorcyclists

If a riding test trial is successful, learner motorcyclists and drivers could soon be evaluated by an automated system instead of a human tester.

According to The Straits Times, the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) has called a tender for a trial of a fully automated circuit that will use technology to test motorcycle riders.


Advertisements  

The Intelligent Driving Circuit (IDC) does not require any human testers, and will eventually replace the current testing method.

The trial will be conducted on selected Class 2, 2A and 2B motorcycles at \ the Singapore Safety Driving Centre (SSDC) in Woodlands Industrial Park.

How Will It Work?

While it would be nice to have a human-looking robot furrowing its brows every time you make a mistake, it’s not exactly as advanced as that.

The motorcycles in the trial will be fitted with analytical equipment such as sensors and cameras, which will detect errors made by the rider.

For instance, there’s an emergency stop station where the automated testing system will detect errors related to speed and safety.


Advertisements  

These errors include:

  • Failing to attain a minimum speed of 30km/h for Class 2B motorcycles and 40km/h for Class 2 and 2A motorcycles before performing the emergency stop
  • Failing to look straight ahead and hold the handlebar firmly with both hands
  • Failing to grip the fuel tank with both knees

The system will also be able to detect if a rider is applying insufficient braking force and  applying the brakes early, to name a few.

Immediate failures include falling off the motorcycle and causing the motorcycle to lean over by more than 45 degrees.

Test Must Be 100% Accurate Before it Can Replace Human Testers

It’s not certain that this automated system will replace human assessors, though.

It will only be considered if it is at least 80% accurate in detecting and highlighting errors.


Advertisements  

And it will need to achieve 100% accuracy if it’s to replace human testers altogether.

The trial itself could take up to a year and a half, so enjoy the empathy and leniency of your human testers while you still can.

Feature Image: Alexander Kirch / Shutterstock.com (Image is for illustration purposes only)

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