There’s a Museum With Break-Up Stories & Items From Broken Relationships

Image: gbtimes.com

I love museums.

In fact, I just visited the British Museum and had to be hauled out for I wanted to spend the night there alongside the many centuries-old mummies occupying a prominent of the majestic building.

Image: CGTN

While most museums we might be accustomed to house historically important artefacts or information, a museum in Beijing stands out for a very different reason – for better or worse.

Beijing Museum of Lost Love (北京失恋博物馆)

While Beijing is home to a fair share of quirky things, ranging from unique gastronomic delights to activities, the Beijing Museum of Lost Love is a museum seeking to bring solace to the capital’s many brokenhearted individuals.

Since late 2015, the museum has amassed an uber-collection of unwanted love memorabilia ranging from love letters to photos, gifts, abandoned pillows of love and whatnot.

Image: Gbtimes.com
Image: Gbtimes.com

Gifts and photos once cherished, now scorned, embellish the walls of the museum painted in off-white, as if signifying the pallidness of what was once red-hot relationships.

Founded by Wang Ying and her partner

The museum is the brainchild of Beijing resident, Wang Ying, and her partner, who decided to exhibit their many failed relationships memorabilia in the two-level museum.

Image: Gbtimes.com

Wang Ying’s very own collection is well-accompanied by more than 100 other love stories which incidentally features more than 100 ways to break up, in part unique and in part, dissimilar from the others.

Perhaps like the many different but oh-so-same shades of gray.

This “Beijing’s biggest artist community” also houses artefacts of love from other failed couples.

This isn’t the only Lovelorn Museum in the World

This Beijing Museum of Lost Love isn’t the first of its kind in the world.

It was first seen in Zagreb, capital of Croatia, and was awarded the title of Europe’s most innovative museum in 2011.

Ah Hock loved Michelle and asked her, ‘Ai stead mai?’ in the 90s. Today, he tried again but would it work? Prepare some tissue paper and watch their love story here:

Image: Brokenships.com

Museum of Broken Relationships in Zagreb

In 2016, a more aesthetically- updated version of the museum opened up in Los Angeles.

Image: Brokenships.com

There is also one in Shanghai, not too distant from Beijing.

A distance that may have once spelt the death-knell for a couple holding onto their LDR between two of China’s biggest cities.

The following video purportedly shows the interior of Shanghai’s building.

Handwritten notes of love or scorn can be seen.

Some visitors, no doubt turned from heart breakers to being heartbroken, give their thoughts as well.

While marriage should indeed stand for better or for worst in my opinion, let’s just say I’ll settle for my normal milk tea over any of the funkier new choices.