Hong Kong Protestors Set Fire On Building Meant for Quarantine Proposes

Image: AFP (Philip Fong)

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Last week, my boss told me that I’d have to move to a different desk in the office because, as he said, “It’s so filthy I’m surprised it isn’t a residential area for cockroaches“.

Now, obviously I was upset with the move because I’ve grown to love my desk and I hate change. So, what did I do?

Well, I argued my case and made a big scene, but my boss insisted that I move. So, I accepted.

But I didn’t know that there was another, more effective solution to show my disapproval, as some Hong Kong protestors have taught me.

Burn the whole office down to the ground.

Yes, my desk would be destroyed too, but so would my boss’s power to move me around the office.

After all, burning my boss is my lifelong dream but that’s for another article.

Hong Kong Protestors Set Fire On Building Meant for Quarantine Proposes

Angered by the government’s plans to turn a residential building into a quarantine facility, some Hong Kong protestors set fire to the lobby of the building on Sunday (26 Jan).


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Oh yeah, they’re finally back in the news.

A Reuters witness saw masked protestors rushing to the public housing block in Hong Kong’s Fanling district (near to the border with China) and set alight a Molotov cocktail before running out.

The windows were also smashed, and black smoke could be seen pouring out of the building to the sound of fire alarms.

Fortunately, the fire was eventually put out by firefighters and the damage appeared to be confined to the lobby area.

But why would they do such a thing?

Protesters Claim It’s Close to a Residential Area

In case you don’t know, a deadly virus that originated from the Chinese city of Wuhan is spreading all over the world.

It has infected over 2,000 people and claimed 80 lives.

So, when the Hong Kong government made plans to convert a newly built residential building into a quarantine facility, many were upset because of its proximity to other residential areas and a primary school.

“We are dissatisfied with the government selecting this housing estate as a (quarantine) separation village as it’s very close to a residential area and a primary school,” said a 28-year-old resident surnamed Tsang.

Oh, for the first time, they’re not protesting against China.

Relationship with China

As you know, there have been major protests in Hong Kong over the last seven months triggered by what they perceive to be growing interference from Beijing.

As CNA reports, the outbreak of the Wuhan virus only piles more pressure onto the Hong Kong authorities.

Suspension of Quarantine Plans

Authorities had earlier said that they wanted to convert “Fai Ming Estate, an unoccupied public estate in Fanling, into temporary flats for quarantine and observation of close contact persons without symptoms if needed”.

However, after the protest, the government said in a statement it would “cease the related preparation work in Fai Ming Estate.”

They have already turned a holiday park into a quarantine facility and plan to do the same for two other holiday parks, but authorities have struggled to find hotels and spare rooms for doctors and nurses working on the isolation wards where patients are being treated.

In Singapore, chalets and university residences have been converted into quarantine zones.


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77 Suspected Cases

At the time of writing, there are 107 people under quarantine and 77 suspected cases of the Wuhan virus in Hong Kong.

Back in our sunny country, four cases have been confirmed, and there are 92 suspect cases.

covid-19

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