Who’s In The Wrong? S’porean Woman Refuses To Give Up Seat To Aunty, Says She Also Paid For The Journey

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You’re sitting on a reserved seat in the MRT, and an auntie walks over to you asking for the seat.

If you’re up within 3 seconds, well good for you.

If you didn’t, you would probably get into a verbal tussle.

Just like this woman over here.

Reader Contributed:Young lady sitting on reserved seat and quarrel with an auntie.Credit: Eddie

Posted by SBS – Sure Boh Singapore on Sunday, 8 October 2017

Right from the get-go, you can see that the situation’s a bit tense. A woman’s on the reserved seat, and an auntie in turquoise is facing her, with a fellow passenger’s arm wrapped around her shoulders.

The woman then told the auntie:

“You pay, I pay.”

“I don’t think you deserve it.” (She’s referring to the seat)

The auntie retorted that she had asked for the seat as her leg was painful.

She scolded the woman, saying that ‘other people’ could give up their seats and that she was being disrespectful.

The two started arguing, and the woman snapped back at the auntie, telling her that “she would have to earn her respect.”

During the process, a passenger sitting next to the woman attempted to diffuse the tension.

She even got up to give her seat to the auntie, while the woman told the auntie to get lost.

When the train pulls into the Tiong Bahru MRT Station, the video ends.

It went viral

The video was uploaded onto SBS – Sure Boh Singapore’s Facebook Page on 8 October, and has since garnered over 52K views, 555 reactions and 391 shares.


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Image: SBS – Sure Boh Singapore Facebook Page

The comments section, interestingly, was split into two different camps.

The pro-Woman Camp

Image: SBS – Sure Boh Singapore Facebook Page

Image: SBS – Sure Boh Singapore Facebook Page

And on the other side of the ring, we have…

The pro-Auntie Camp

Image: SBS – Sure Boh Singapore Facebook Page


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Image: SBS – Sure Boh Singapore Facebook Page

Image: SBS – Sure Boh Singapore Facebook Page

Image: SBS – Sure Boh Singapore Facebook Page

I have to admit though; the pro-Woman camp seems to be dominating at the moment.

Goody Talks

Are you required to give up your reserved seat to another passenger, just because he or she asked for it?


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Technically, you’re not required to. There’s no official rule in the book that states that you have to give up your seat.

Which brings it down to one single aspect.

Goodwill.

You can be a good samaritan and give up your seat for somebody who needs the seat more than you.

Or you can reject the person and continue taking the seat.


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You’re not wrong, whether it’s the first scenario, or the second one. It’s just a matter of public opinion: the first one will entice people to throw flowers over your head and whip out Ukeleles and start playing ‘Hallelujah’. The second one, on the other hand, will invite quite a fair bit of harsh comments, as well as a flurry of dirty looks.

In fact, I would say that it takes way more bravado to take on the second scenario.

So what now?

This Netizen had a suggestion to make.

Image: SBS – Sure Boh Singapore Facebook Page

And I must say it makes a lot of sense.


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Perhaps it’s something for SMRT to consider? It could just prevent a full-on brawl from happening in the future.

#youneverknow

But one thing’s for sure: the reserved seat argument will always be on the Internet as long as a phone has a camera. And we’re all pretty sure there won’t be a camera without a phone. I mean, a phone without a camera.

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This article was first published on goodyfeed.com

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Featured Image: Facebook (SBS – Sure Boh Singapore)